Descarga gratuita de libros en formato mobi. Richard Matheson's Monsters: Gender in the Stories, Scripts, Novels, and Twilight Zone Episodes

Richard Matheson's Monsters: Gender in the Stories, Scripts, Novels, and Twilight Zone Episodes

Richard Matheson's Monsters: Gender in the Stories, Scripts, Novels, and Twilight Zone Episodes

by June M. Pulliam, Anthony J. Fonseca

Editorial: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
ISBN: 9781442260672
Número de páginas: 256
Formatos: pdf, ePub, mobi, fb2
Tamaño de archivo: 7 Mb
Fecha de publicación: 2020-07-29
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Descripción

The author of dozens of novels, hundreds of short stories, and many screenplays, Richard Matheson was one of the leading writers of science fiction, fantasy, and horror in the twentieth century. Matheson’s most famous early works, the novels I Am Legend (1954) and The Shrinking Man (1956), both depict traditionally masculine figures thrust into extraordinary situations. In the late 1950s, Matheson also began writing scripts for television, notably for The Twilight Zone, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, and Star Trek, which explored similar themes found in his stories and novels. In Richard Matheson’s Monsters: Gender in the Stories, Scripts, Novels and Twilight Zone Episodes, June Pulliam and Anthony J. Fonseca examine how this groundbreaking author’s writings shed light on society’s ever-shifting attitudes on masculinity and domesticity. In this first full-length critical study of Mathson’s entire literary output, the authors discuss how I Am Legend, The Shrinking Man, and other works question traditional male roles. In addition, the authors examine how Matheson’s scripts for The Twilight Zone represented changing expectations in male behavior with the onset of the sexual and feminist revolutions, industrialization and globalization, and other issues. Other thought-provoking novels, including Hell House (1971), Bid Time Return (1975), What Dreams May Come (1978)—as well as short stories and screenplays—convey the ambiguous status of masculinity—how men should behave vis-à-vis women and what role they should occupy in the family dynamic and in society at large. Richard Matheson’s Monsters demonstrates how the author’s work asks profound questions about the status of men and women in a society where gender roles are becoming increasingly ambiguous. This significant study will be of interest to scholars of literature, film, and television, as well those interested in gender and masculinity studies.